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Today is August 24

North Atlantic Treaty

August 24, 1949

U.S. President Harry S. Truman signs the North Atlantic Treaty, making it effective. The treaty forms the legal basis of, and is implemented by, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

From: (https://www.ThisDayTrivia.com/trivia/august-24?f=NATO-Effective#NATO-Effective)

 

British Attack Washington D.C.

August 24, 1814

The Capitol and White House are burned during the War of 1812. First Lady Dolley Madison saved valuables from the White House (then known as the “President’s House”), while senior officials fled to Virginia.
The Library of Congress was housed in the North Wing of the Capitol building at the time and most of its 3,000 books were destroyed.

NATIONAL PEACH PIE DAY

On August National Peach Pie Day is observed annually on August 24th.  We celebrate this mouth-watering dessert during the heart of the Peach harvest season. Don’t forget the à la mode!

Generally speaking, there are two types of peaches – freestone and clingstone. The difference is in the way the flesh comes away from the pit in the middle of the peach. When the meat comes away freely from the stone, the peach is a freestone peach; if the flesh clings to it, it’s a clingstone.

While Georgia may be the first state to come to mind when we think of peaches, California actually leads the nation in production. In the United States, 20 states produce peaches commercially. Besides California and Georgia, the other two top producers are South Carolina and New Jersey. Pennsylvania and Washington grow a lot of peaches, too.

Peaches are best enjoyed ripe, juicy, and fresh. However, when that’s not possible, pastry comes to the rescue! The sweet juices of peaches come to life when we add a little sugar and seasonings. Envelope them in a flakey crust and bake for about an hour and the syrupy sweetness clings to the fruit. Add vanilla ice cream for a creamy reminder that summer isn’t quite over. Not yet, anyway. 

More Peach Facts
  • Georgia is known as the Peach State.
  • Peach harvest occurs between June and August.
  • Harvest from each peach tree lasts about one week.
  • A medium peach weighs 2.6 oz.
  • A medium peach typically contains 30 calories, 7 g of carbohydrate, 1 g of protein, 140 mg of potassium, and 8% of the daily value for vitamin C.
  • Peach Pie FAQ

    Q. Should I remove the peach skin to make pie filling?
    A. No. The peach’s skin adds color and texture to the pie.

    Q. What makes pie filling thick?
    A. Most bakers use corn starch to thicken pies. However, other starchy thickeners include tapioca and flour. Alternatively, gelatin or a combination of starches will also thicken a pie.

    Q. When are peaches in season?
    A. Depending on the variety, the peach season begins in May and runs through September. The harvest peaks in July and August.

    Q. How many peaches are in a bushel?
    A. Peaches come in different sizes, but on average, about 50 pounds of peaches fill a bushel. That’s equal to about 150 peaches.

Peach Pie recipe from https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/87979/peach-pie-the-old-fashioned-two-crust-way/

Ingredients

Original recipe yields 8 servings
Ingredient Checklist
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  • Directions

    Instructions Checklist
    • Preheat the oven to 450 degrees F (220 degrees C).

    • Line the bottom and sides of a 9 inch pie plate with one of the pie crusts. Brush with some of the beaten egg to keep the dough from becoming soggy later.

    • Place the sliced peaches in a large bowl, and sprinkle with lemon juice. Mix gently. In a separate bowl, mix together the flour, sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt. Pour over the peaches, and mix gently. Pour into the pie crust, and dot with butter. Cover with the other pie crust, and fold the edges under. Flute the edges to seal or press the edges with the tines of a fork dipped in egg. Brush the remaining egg over the top crust. Cut several slits in the top crust to vent steam.

    • Bake for 10 minutes in the preheated oven, then reduce the heat to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) and bake for an additional 30 to 35 minutes, until the crust is brown and the juice begins to bubble through the vents. If the edges brown to fast, cover them with strips of aluminum foil about halfway through baking. Cool before serving. This tastes better warm than hot.